Netherlands Embassy in Canada

The Dutch Embassy in Ottawa, Canada, provides consular assistance to Dutch citizens currently residing or planning to reside in Canada. The Embassy also serves foreigners who want to live in the Netherlands, invest, or visit for a holiday.

This guide provides all you need to know about the services offered by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Canada, processing times, fees, as well as the procedures you’ll have to follow and the documents to submit.

If you’re planning to move to the Netherlands or to visit for business purposes or studying, it helps to know in advance what documentation you will need.

Embassy of The Netherlands in Canada

Table of Contents

The Dutch Embassy in Canada

The Dutch Embassy performs legalization of documents for the Netherlands, as long as they have first been authenticated by Global Affairs Canada. It also legalizes Dutch documents for use in Canada.

It also processes passport and identity (ID) card applications, visas, and issues consular certificates such as certificates of residence and certificates of life.

There is the Dutch Embassy in Ottawa, as well as a number of Dutch Consulates in Canada. There is a Consulate General in Toronto and one in Vancouver, as well as Honorary Consulates in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, Saskatoon, and Winnipeg.

Each Embassy or Consulate is responsible for a specific region in Canada.

Processing time

The document processing time for legalization is at least a month.

Canadian documents must first be authenticated by Global Affairs Canada in Ottawa. Then, they can be legalized by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Ottawa to be valid for use in the Netherlands.

Global Affairs Canada takes up to 20 business days if the documents are sent by mail or courier, and this does not include shipping time to and from Global Affairs Canada.

The Dutch Embassy Canada takes up to 5 working days to process your documents.

It’s a lengthy process, but there are ways to make it more manageable. We’ll share how in this guide.

Language requirements

If the document you need to attest is not in Dutch, English, Frech, or German, you may need to have it translated. The following requirements apply:

  • Your document must be translated by a sworn translator.
  • It must be translated into Dutch, English, French or German.
  • If the sworn translator is not registered in the Netherlands, you must also have the translation legalized.
  • If you use a translator based in Canada, they must be certified by the professional translators association of the province or territory concerned.

Payment methods

In person, you can pay by cash, certified check or money order from a Canadian bank, or by credit card (Visa or Mastercard).

If sending documents by post, you may enclose a certified cheque or money order (payable to ‘Netherlands Embassy’), or pay by credit card if you enclose the necessary authorisation details. Please also include your address, phone number and email address, in case the Embassy needs to contact you.

Contact details

The Embassy of Netherlands in Ottawa

Netherlands Consulate in Toronto

Netherlands Consulate in Vancouver

Honorary Consulate in Calgary

Honorary Consulate in Edmonton

Honorary Consulate in Halifax

Honorary Consulate in Montreal

Honorary Consulate in Quebec

Honorary Consulate in Saskatoon

Honorary Consulate in Winnipeg

Opening Hours

Dutch Embassy

Netherlands Consulate in Toronto

Netherlands Consulate in Vancouver

Honorary Consulates in Edmonton, Saskatoon, and Winnipeg

Honorary Consulates in Halifax, Montreal, and Quebec

Honorary Consulate in Calgary

Legalization

Documents being used in the Netherlands for personal or business matters must be legalized by the Dutch Embassy in Canada to be valid for use. The same applies for Dutch documents to be used in Canada.

This process is called legalization, attestation, authentication, or apostille. (There are subtle differences to each of these, but the terms are often used interchangeably.)

Below, you can find tables with valuable information on the Dutch Embassy legalization process, including costs and timelines for legalizing the following documents:

  • Diplomas
  • Certificates
  • Civil status records
  • Original birth certificates
  • Original marriage certificates
  • Original death certificates
  • Official copies of divorce certificates
  • Certificate of unmarried status

 

While you may be searching for an apostille stamp birth certificate Netherlands, it’s good to know that apostilles are not recognized in Canada. You have to ask for a legalization instead.

Legalization of Canadian documents for use in the Netherlands

Canadian documents
When is an attestation needed?
Canadian documents must be legalized by the Canadian authorities and then by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Canada to be legally approved for use in the Netherlands.
Description
  • Diplomas
  • Certificates
  • Civil status records
    • Original birth certificates
    • Original marriage certificates 
    • Original death certificates 
    • Official copies of divorce certificates 
    • Certificate of unmarried status
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use their documents in the Netherlands.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
5 working days.
Criteria for attestation
  • The document must be an original and complete long-form document. If the document refers to other documents or annexes, these must be included.

 

    • For birth, marriage, death, and proof of unmarried status certificates:
      • Contact the provincial Vital Statistics office.

 

    • For divorce certificates:
      • Request them from the court where the divorce was granted.
      • You must have a photocopy of the divorce order or judgement.
      • If you don't have either of these, divorce records can be requested from the Central Registry of Divorce Proceedings in Ottawa.

 

  • If your document is not in Dutch, English, French, or German, you may need to have it translated. The following requirements apply:
    • Your document must be translated by a sworn translator.
    • It must be translated into Dutch, English, French, or German.
    • If the sworn translator is not registered in the Netherlands, you must also have the translation legalized.
    • If you use a translator based in Canada, they must be certified by the professional translators association of the province or territory concerned.

 

  • Documents must be authenticated by Global Affairs Canada prior to being submitted to the Dutch Embassy.
How to submit

By mail:

  • Global Affairs Canada can deliver your document to the Dutch Embassy or Consulates. 
  • When sending your document to Global Affairs Canada, include a separate, sealed envelope containing your payment (see submission notes) and your address, phone number and email address. The envelope should be addressed to the Dutch Embassy or Consulate.
  • The document will be returned to you by regular post, free of charge. 
  • If you prefer receiving the document by Xpress post, refer to the instructions here

 

In person: 

  • Due to Covid-19 regulations, you must book an appointment online prior to showing up. 
  • You can book the appointment here
  • If no times are available, it is not yet possible to book appointments.
Submission Notes
  • In person: you may pay the fee in cash, by certified cheque or money order from a Canadian bank, or by credit card (Visa or Mastercard).
  • By mail: you may enclose a certified cheque or money order (payable to ‘Netherlands Embassy’), or pay by credit card if you enclose the necessary authorization details.

Legalization of Dutch documents for use in Canada

All documents must be legalized by the Consular Service Centre (CDC) prior to being legalized by the Canadian authorities. This takes around 1 hour, but may take longer if you have more than 20 documents. The fee is €10 per document. 

You can also send in the documents to the CDC by registered post. Include your name, address, email address and telephone number. Do not send cash. After the CDC has received your document(s) you will receive an email telling you how much you have to pay using an electronic payment method. 

You also need to pay for them to be returned to you by registered post, which costs €9.05. The documents will be returned back within 5 to 7 working days. 

The CDC can directly legalize documents from the Dutch organisations listed here. This means that no other parties are involved. The documents must include the name and signature of an authorized staff member at the organisation.

The below tables outline the process of legalizing Dutch documents to be used in Canada, including all the criteria for legalization, fees, and submission process for: 

  • Business and trade documents
  • Education documents
  • Government-issued documents
  • Legal documents
  • Translated documents
  • Medical documents

Legalisation of documents Netherlands

Business and trade documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use a Dutch business document or trade document abroad, you need to have it legalized. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the document abroad.
Description

Business documents:

  • an agreement for the use of a lease car abroad
  • employment contracts
  • KvK extracts
  • And others.

 

Trade documents:

  • commercial declarations, such as articles of association or analytical reports
  • export documents and certificates of origin
  • other documents.
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use Dutch business or trade documents abroad.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • To be legalized, these types of documents must first be legalized by the Dutch Chamber of Commerce (Kamer van Koophandel; KvK).
  • However, extracts from the KvK bearing a name and signature do not need to be legalized by the KvK.
  • They must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre (CDC) in The Hague.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process. 
Education documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use a Dutch education document abroad, you need to have them legalized. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the document abroad.
Description
  • Diploma
  • List of grades
  • A certificate
  • Proof of enrolment in a course 
  • And other documents.
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use Dutch education documents abroad.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • To be legalized, these types of documents must first be legalized by the Education Executive Agency (DUO).
    • If DUO can’t help, photocopy your document and have it certified by a notary. 
  • For medical qualifications:
    • Contact the Central Information Unit on Health Care Professions (CIBG). 
    • If CIBG cannot help you, contact the Consular Service Centre (CSC) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Netherlands
  • Following the fulfillment of the above criteria, the document must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process.
Government-issued documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use a document issued by the Dutch government abroad, you need to have them legalized. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the document abroad.
Description
  • A civil status document
    • birth certificates
    • marriage certificates
    • death certificates
    • certificates of unmarried status
    • And others
  • A photocopy of your Dutch passport
  • A certificate of residence issued by the Tax and Customs Administration
  • And other documents.
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use documents issued by the Dutch government abroad.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • For civil status documents: 
    • The documents must first be legalized by the municipality that issued them.
  • For passport photocopies: 
    • You can have a photocopy of your passport legalized by the municipality that issued the passport.
    • You can also have the photocopy legalized first by a Dutch notary and then by a district court.
  • For certificates of residence issued by the Tax and Customs Administration:
    • The documents must first be legalized by the Ministry of Finance, Directorate General of the Tax and Customs Administration, in The Hague. 
    • Contact the Tax and Customs Administration to learn how it works.
  • Following the fulfillment of the above criteria, the document must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process. 
Legal documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use a Dutch legal document abroad, you need to have it legalized. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the document abroad.
Description
  • A court order
  • A document drawn up by a lawyer
  • A power of attorney
  • A document drawn up by a notary or sworn translator
  • Your own signature on a document
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use Dutch legal documents abroad.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • For court orders:
    • Take the order (in family law or civil proceedings) to the central information desk of the court that issued it.
    • Ask for a signed official copy, stamped with ‘true copy of original’ (‘kopie conform origineel’).
    • Make sure that the name of the court staff member is also on the copy.
  • For documents drawn up by a lawyer:
    • First, have your document legalized by a notary.
    • Then have your document legalized by the district court.
  • For power of attorney:
    • First, have your signature legalized by a notary.
    • Then have your power of attorney legalized by the district court.
    • In some cases, your municipality may be authorized to legalize powers of attorney.
  • For a document drawn up by a notary or sworn translator:
    • It must be legalized by a district court.
    • When having a translation legalized, you must also provide the original Dutch-language document (or a photocopy of it).
  • For your own signature on a document:
    • There are various ways.
      • By municipality: the municipality that issued your Dutch passport can legalize your signature.
      • By notary: you can also have your signature legalized by a Dutch notary.
    • Following the fulfillment of the above criteria, the document must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process
Translated documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use Dutch documents abroad, you may need to have it translated. After translation, you may also need to legalize both the source document and the translation. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the source document and the translation abroad.
Description
Translated documents
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use Dutch legal documents abroad and may need to translate them.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • Have the document translated by a sworn translator. 
    • To find a sworn translator: consult the website of the Legal Aid Council (Raad van Rechtsbijstand (Bureau Wbtv).
    • Check whether you need to have both the source document and the translation legalized or just the source document.
  • Go to a district court to have the sworn translator's signature legalised.

 

  • Following the fulfillment of the above criteria, the document must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.
    • The translation must be attached by the translator to the source document or to a photocopy of the source document.
    • The translation must not be in Dutch.
    • The source document must be drawn up in the Netherlands in Dutch, English, French or German OR drawn up abroad with the legalization procedure completed in the country where it was drawn up.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process. 
Medical documents
When is an attestation needed?
In order to use a Dutch medical document abroad, you need to have it legalized. This is done with a stamp or sticker. After legalization, you can use the document abroad.
Description
  • A medical certificate
  • A medication certificate
  • A veterinary certificate
  • And other documents.
Who can apply?
Persons who need to use Dutch medical documents abroad.
Fee (in CAD)
39
Processing Time
Unkown
Criteria for attestation
  • For a medical certificate issued by a general practitioner or specialist:
    • Legalization is not always required. Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands to find out. 
    • If it is required, have the documents legalized by the Central Information Unit on Health Care Professions (CIBG)
  • For a medication certificate:
    • You must first have your document legalized by the Central Administrative Office for Exceptional Medical Insurance (CAK). 
  • For pet passports and veterinary certificates:
    • You can find the information here

 

  • Following the fulfillment of the above criteria, the document must then be legalized by the Consular Service Centre at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.
How to submit
  • After the above criteria have been fulfilled, your document must be legalized by the Canadian authorities.
  • Contact the Canadian Embassy in the Netherlands, who will guide you through the exact process.

How DAC can help you

The legalization process can be overwhelming, especially on top of relocation to another country or big life changes. It is a time-consuming process with varied document requirements, fees, and other elements that you might not have time to consider.

If you have Dutch documents to prepare for Canada, the process can get more complicated as it involves liaising with different Dutch entities, depending on by whom the document was issued.

Our expert team can take care of the process for you, ensuring you meet all document requirements when submitting your request and that your timelines are met.

Get in touch with our expert team on xxxx to request a quote and a free document evaluation.

Q&A

Canadian documents must be authenticated by Global Affairs Canada and then legalized by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Canada to be legally approved for use in the Netherlands.

Authentication by Global Affairs Canada takes up to 20 business days if the documents are sent by mail or courier, and this does not include shipping time to and from Global Affairs Canada. The Dutch Embassy or Consulates will then take 5 working days to send back the documents.

Details regarding fees, required documents, and processing times can be found in the above tables. Once legalized, the document is ready to be used in the Netherlands.

However, this is a fairly complex process with many documents and waiting times involved. At Document Authentication Canada we work closely with the Netherlands Embassy in Canada and Global Affairs Canada to facilitate and expedite the legalization process. Get in touch with our expert team on XXX XXX for assistance.

If the document you need to legalize is not in Dutch, English, French, or German, you may need to have it translated. The following requirements apply:

  • Your document must be translated by a sworn translator.
  • It must be translated into Dutch, English, French or German.
  • If the sworn translator is not registered in the Netherlands, you must also have the translation legalized.
  • If you use a translator based in Canada, they must be certified by the professional translators association of the province or territory concerned.

 

You should confirm with the Dutch Embassy in Canada regarding the translation of documents.

You can either be a Dutch national residing in Canada, or a Canadian seeking to go live or work in the Netherlands. You’ll need to legalize the documents for them to be valid in either country

Embassy of The Netherlands in Canada

Looking for a Faster Apostille?

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Other Consular Services offered by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Canada

The Dutch Embassy offers a number of other services related to passports, ID cards, Visas, consular certificates, MVV applications, and consular declarations. All the fees for these services are listed here. The following subsections give information about each of these services.

Passport

If you’re a Dutch national living in Canada, you can renew or apply for a Dutch passport or ID card. You can do so at the Dutch Embassy or Consulates in Vancouver, Toronto, or Edmonton. You can also lodge your application at a Dutch border municipality or at the Schiphol desk. If applying in Edmonton, there is an additional service fee.

You can go through the checklist for applying for a passport to know exactly what documents you need.

Your passport will be ready in about 3 weeks. If additional documents are required, it may take longer. You will receive it by post, which is why you need to include an Xpresspost envelope with your application.

ID Card

To apply for an ID card, it is important to note that from July 13th to August 1st 2021 inclusive, you cannot apply for an ID card at the Dutch Embassy or Consulates. This is because the ID card is changing to include copies of two fingerprints and a QR code with the citizen service number (BSN), which will be issued from August 2nd. As of this date, you need to apply in person at the Embassy or Consulates to get your fingerprints taken. 

You can go through the checklist for applying for an ID card to know exactly what documents you need.

Your ID card will be ready in about 3 weeks. If additional documents are required, it may take longer. You must collect the ID card at the Embassy in Ottawa, or the Consulates in Vancouver or Toronto. You need an appointment scheduled via email to pick it up.

Visas at the Embassy of the Netherlands

There are 5 types of visas that can be obtained from the Dutch Embassy in Canada. You can also submit your application at the Dutch visa application centers (VAC) in Vancouver, Edmonton, or Toronto.  You must apply in person, and you will receive the visa by mail due to Covid-19 restrictions. 

The 5 types of visas are the following:

  • Long-stay Caribbean visa (for Dutch territories in the Caribbean)
  • Short-stay Caribbean visa (for Dutch territories in the Caribbean)
  • Long-stay visa (MVV) 
  • Short-stay Schengen visa 
  • Airport transit visa

 

The following subsections give more information about each visa.

Long-stay Caribbean visa

If you live in Canada and need a visa to collect your residence permit for the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom, this is the one you need. You can only apply for a long-stay visa if you have also applied for a residence permit.

You’ll need the application form along with official documents.

Short-stay Caribbean visa

If you live in Canada and want to apply for a visa to visit Aruba, Curaçao or the other Caribbean parts of the Kingdom for up to 90 days, this is the visa you need. 

You need the application form along with official documents and documents related to the purpose of your visit. 

For every document, you must bring the original and one photocopy with you. The Embassy or Consulate cannot make photocopies for you. You will be informed within 15 calendar days whether your application has been successful.

Long-stay visa (MVV)

If you want to stay in the Netherlands for longer than 90 days, you will need a residence permit. In many cases you will also have to apply for a long-stay visa before you travel to the Netherlands. This visa is also called an authorization for temporary stay (MVV).

You must apply for this type of visa via a host or apply yourself at the Dutch Embassy or Consulates. This depends on the nature of your stay. 

If the purpose of your stay is study, work, a work placement, cohabiting with or marrying someone who lives in the Netherlands, or family reunification, you need to apply via a host. If you are going because this is the orientation year as a highly-skilled migrant seeking employment, or you’re an independent entrepreneur, start-up, or foreign investor, you should apply for yourself. 

You’ll need the MVV issue form and official documents. The process will take around 100 days.

Short-stay Schengen visa

If you live in Canada and want to apply for a short-stay visa for the Netherlands, this is the visa you’ll need. Due to Covid-19, it is not possible to extend a visa. Not even if, due to circumstances, the visa expired unused. You will have to apply for a new visa.

You’ll need official documents and a completed and signed visa application form.

You should apply no later than 15 working days in advance. In most cases, you will be informed within 15 calendar days whether your application has been successful. However, it can sometimes take up to 45 days, for example, if extra documents are required.

Airport transit visa

If you live in Canada and want to apply for an airport transit visa for the Netherlands, this is the visa you’ll need. Due to Covid-19, it is not possible to extend a visa. Not even if, due to circumstances, the visa expired unused. You will have to apply for a new visa.

You’ll need official documents and a completed and signed visa application form.

You should apply no later than 15 working days in advance. In most cases, you will be informed within 15 calendar days whether your application has been successful. However, it can sometimes take up to 45 days, for example, if extra documents are required.

Consular Declarations

This service is only available for Dutch nationals abroad. You might need this document if you need to submit one to the Social Insurance Bank (SVB), a pension fund, a Dutch municipality, or the authorities in the country where you live.

You can apply for consular declarations at a Dutch Embassy or Consulate. These are the types of declarations you may require: 

  • Certificate of residence
  • Certificate of life

 

To obtain a certificate of residence, you need to book an appointment online at the Embassy or Consulates of the Netherlands. If no times are available, you cannot submit the application in person. 

The other method is to send it by post either to the Embassy in Ottawa or the Consulates in Toronto and Vancouver. In your request, you must indicate the purpose for which you need the document. It takes approximately 3 working days to process the application.

The Dutch Embassy or Consulate will mail the certificate to you (including any original documents) by regular mail. If you prefer it to be shipped by trackable mail, provide a self-addressed Canada Post Xpresspost mailer with your application.

You can obtain a certificate of life at the Embassy or Consulates. You need to book an appointment online. The document is generally prepared while you wait, and when this is not possible, you have to come back another day or let it be sent to you by mail.


Unmarried status declaration Netherlands and Dutch nationality certificates cannot be obtained from the Embassy or Consulates but they may help direct you to the right authorities to contact.

Q&A II

You can apply for a visa at the Dutch Embassy in Ottawa by booking an appointment. You can also submit your application at the Dutch visa application centers (VAC) in Vancouver, Edmonton, or Toronto.  You must apply in person, and you will receive the visa by mail due to Covid-19 restrictions. 

The above guide explains the 5 different types of visas that are available and the document requirements.

No, you can’t. You can only renew your Dutch passport in person. 

You can either visit the Dutch Embassy in Ottawa or the Consulates in Toronto and Vancouver by booking an appointment. Another option is to visit the Honorary Consulate in Edmonton, also by booking an appointment. You can also lodge your application at a Dutch border municipality or at the Schiphol desk.

You obtain a Dutch passport by visiting the Dutch Embassy in Ottawa or the Consulates in Toronto and Vancouver by booking an appointment. Another option is to visit the Honorary Consulate in Edmonton, also by booking an appointment. You can also lodge your application at a Dutch border municipality or at the Schiphol desk.You can check the document requirements by running through the checklist.

There is one Dutch Embassy. However, there are also two Dutch Consulates and 6 Honorary Consulates which offer the same services. The contact details and opening hours of each Dutch mission can be found above.

IN CONCLUSION

This guide should have provided a clearer idea of the legalization process and all the services that are provided by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Canada: services related to passports, visas, ID cards, and consular declarations. 

There is, admittedly, a lot to sort through to legalize your documents ahead of a move, a new job or a commercial undertaking. 

At DAC, we help facilitate the legalization of documents in Canada, navigating through the bureaucracy on your behalf so that you avoid unnecessary delays. Get in touch with our expert team on xxxx to request a quote and a free document evaluation.

Embassy of The Netherlands in Canada

About The Author

Nidhal Abu, Director of Operations

Nidhal is an expert in the international community in Ottawa and is currently completing his paralegal license. He manages all client relationships and oversees DAC’s daily operations.